Where and How You Can Vote on Election Day

Just because it’s an odd-numbered year doesn’t mean that Tuesday’s elections are lacking drama. Here’s a guide to where and how you can vote.,

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What’s at stake? Is it too late to register to vote? Making sense of Election Day.

Nov. 2, 2021, 10:44 a.m. ET

Nov. 2, 2021, 10:44 a.m. ET

By using Vote411 and entering your address, you can find out more about the elections where you live.Credit…Ahmed Gaber for The New York Times

Just because it’s an odd-numbered year — a hiatus from Electoral College math and midterm machinations — doesn’t mean that Tuesday’s elections are lacking national implications and drama.

There is an array of key races across the country, from gubernatorial contests in Virginia and New Jersey to mayoral elections in New York City, Boston and Minneapolis, where voters will also decide the future of that city’s embattled police department. In Pennsylvania, a state Supreme Court seat — an elected position — is at stake, as are a multitude of municipal school boards and other local offices.

Here’s a guide to where and how you can vote.

Is there an election where I live?

If you live in Colorado, Maine, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia or Washington State, you have statewide elections on Tuesday. By using Vote411 and entering your address, you can find out more about more about the elections where you live.

How can I find out what I’m voting on?

Each state and many municipalities typically post copies of sample ballots online so that voters can familiarize themselves with the candidates and referendum questions. Vote411 also keeps a full list of races.

Where do I vote?

If you want to vote in person, each state has an online portal where you can look up your polling location and hours (and see if you have early-voting options).

Do I need to show identification?

Some states require voters to show identification. You can find out here whether your state has an ID requirement, and if so, what forms of ID qualify.

What if I’m turned away?

Most states are required to offer residents a provisional ballot if poll workers can’t find your registration, which can happen if there’s a clerical error. Be sure to ask for a provisional ballot, which will be counted once election officials verify your registration.

Can I vote by mail?

Many states require mail-in ballots to be postmarked by Election Day, so if you haven’t requested one by now, it may be too late. Depending on your state, you may be able to pick up and return a mail ballot at an election office.

How do I report voter suppression?

You can contact the election office for your state or territory, or you can file a report with the Civil Rights Division of the Justice Department. The Justice Department also runs a voting rights hotline at 1-800-253-3931. The American Civil Liberties Union runs a nonpartisan hotline at 1-866-OUR-VOTE.

When will we know results?

Votes cast in person on Tuesday will be counted by that night, though state laws vary for when election workers can start counting mail-in ballots. If a race turns out to be lopsided, a winner could be declared soon after the polls close. Be prepared to wait until late Tuesday night — or beyond — if it is a tight contest.

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